Awkward Objects: The Work of Alina Szapocznikow

This weekend, I travelled to Wakefield to see Human Landscapes,  the first UK retrospective of the work of the much-overlooked Polish artist Alina Szapocznikow (1926–1973). Powerful, innovative, disturbing, these pieces have dark undertones, which isn't surprising when you discover that Szapocznikow survived several of the Nazi camps as a teenager, and bouts of severe illness. … Continue reading Awkward Objects: The Work of Alina Szapocznikow

Making a Mark: The Art of Automatism

Automatic drawing or painting can be described as “expressing the subconscious” using any technique that eliminates conscious control and replaces it with chance. The basic techniques originate from spiritualism, practiced by artists such as Georgiana Houghton and Hilma Af Klint, both of whom have recently had their work exhibited in a revival of interest and … Continue reading Making a Mark: The Art of Automatism

Homage to Hannelore Baron

                           There is something raw and deeply absorbing about Hannelore Baron's multi-layered work. Found materials are combined with enigmatic text and abstract figures in her collages and box constructions. The work suggests both the condition of entrapment and the possibility of release, no doubt informed by her early traumatic experiences of war in Germany in … Continue reading Homage to Hannelore Baron

The First Abstractionists

Two interesting exhibitions in London recently: Hilma Af Klint at the Serpentine Galleries and Georgiana Houghton at the Courtauld Institute of Art. Hilma Af Klint (1862–1944), of Sweden was creating abstract works about five years before Kandinsky. Through her work with the group "The Five,” af Klint created experimental automatic drawing as early as 1896, … Continue reading The First Abstractionists